Tag Archives: street art

Imagine Just Casually Strolling Down The Street When All Of A Sudden… WATCH OUT! Wait, What?

British chalk and street artist Julian Beever (not to be confused with teen heartthrob Justin Bieber) is known all over the world for his stunning pavement drawings, and especially his 3D illusions, which are drawn in a special distortion to create an impression of 3D when seen from one particular viewpoint. His works are so amazing that people call him the Pavement Picasso, and when you see these incredible works of art below you’ll agree.

What immense imagination he has, some of these don’t even look real, like they are from some other magical realm. Source: Julian Beever and imgur Share these incredible pictures of Julian’s street art with your friends below.

30 Jaw-Dropping Pieces Of Bristol Street Art

There’s more to us than Banksy.

1. The Masonic, North Street, Bedminster

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Dan Kitchener. Visit his Facebook page here.

A vibrant and multi-coloured mural across the side of one of North Street’s pubs.

2. Hamilton House, Stokes Croft

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Cosmo Sarson. Visit his Facebook page here.

An enormous breakdancing Jesus on the side of one of Bristol’s arts and music hubs.

3. Red Point Climbing Centre, Winterstoke Road

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: DALeast.
Artist: Masai.

A multi-artist work on the sides of this old cinema.

4. Gloucester Road

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Burning Candy Crew. See more of the collective’s work here.

Signature colour-work from this east London collective in Bristol.

5. North Street, Southville, from Upfest 2013

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Inkie.
Artist: Tom Lane.
Artist: Ged Palmer.

A piece in a maritime-tobacco-tin style: Bristolian perfection covering an entire wall.

6. Nelson Street, Bristol City Centre

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Pixel Pancho. Visit his Facebook page here.

Industrial and robotic craziness from a Turin-based street artist.

7. West Street, Bedminster

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Andy Council. Visit his Flickr page here.

A stunning galloping horse made up of south Bristol’s most iconic buildings.

8. The Farm, St Werburghs

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Xenz. Visit his Twitter page here.

Bucolic brilliance in the glorious beer garden of this pub.

9. M32, Bristol

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Zase. Visit his Twitter page here.

The Zase vs Dekor Turtle race is in a residential area, visible from the M32 near Ikea.

10. Souk Kitchen, Raleigh Road, Southville

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Andrew Burns Colwill.

The mysterious Bristol crocodile and friend get an outing against a deliciously delicate backdrop.

11. Red Point Climbing Centre, Winterstoke Road

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Jody Thomas. Visit his Twitter page here.

Multiple pieces of stunningly lifelike large-scale art inside this building.

12. Nelson Street, Bristol City Centre

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography

Artist: El Mac.

There’s incredible detail in this monumental piece by Los Angeles artist El Mac.

13. Little Bishop Street, St Pauls

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Silent Hobo. Visit his Facebook page here.

Local vibrancy captured at the heart of one of Bristol’s greatest communities.

14. The Kings Arms, Black Boy Hill

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Zase. Visit his Twitter page here.

Terrific detail and sunny styling in one of Whiteladies Road’s most popular pubs.

15. Nelson Street, Bristol City Centre

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Nick Walker. Visit his Facebook page here.

“Vandal” is a piece that towers over Nelson Street and pours down on to the pavement below.

16. Hill Street, Bristol City Centre

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Jon5

An incredible use of a small space to make a big piece come to life.

17. Nelson Street, Bristol City Centre

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Mariusz Waras.

A huge-scale industrial mural depicting Bristol’s mechanical past, from the M-City project.

18. Stokes Croft

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artists: 3-DOM and VOYDER.

A striking collaborative work created high on a building on Stokes Croft.

19. The Old Bookshop, North Street, Bedminster

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Sokar Uno. Visit his Facebook page here.

Check out the beautiful use of colour and shade on the side of this Bedminster cocktail bar and venue.

20. Duke of York, St Werburghs

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Alex Mack. Visit her Facebook page here.

A “Grand Old Duke of York”-inspired mural by Alex Mack, created after she won the owner of this pub’s competition to design a piece.

21. Full Moon, Stokes Croft

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Cheba. Find him on Twitter here.

A gorgeous astrological mural covering the entirety of this backpacker hostel.

22. Raleigh Road, Southville

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: My Dog Sighs. Visit his Facebook page here.

This warehouse door is characteristic of the artist, who often depicts eyes.

23. Hillgrove Street, Stokes Croft

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography

Artist: Phlegm.

A collaborative work between two artists with different illustrative styles on two sides of a house.

24. Lakota, Stokes Croft

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Cheo.
Artist: Minto.

A stunning mix of two artists’ styles wrap around this iconic Stokes Croft building.

25. Thekla, The Grove, Bristol City Centre

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Inkie. Visit his Facebook page here.

A brand new work from a Bristol street-art original on the rejuvenated floating nightclub Thekla.

26. Nine Tree Hill, Stokes Croft

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Fois.

There are big, contrasting colours on this multi-sectioned piece set back from the kerb on this historic and ever-changing street.

27. Portland Heights, St Pauls

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Silent Hobo. Visit his Facebook page here.

An almost shop-window-style mural on the side of this modern building, off Dean Street in St Pauls.

28. Stokes Croft

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Dan Kitchener. Visit his Facebook page here.

A stunning street mural of light and colour reflecting the atmosphere of its location, a short walk from the Bear Pit roundabout.

29. Mina Road, St Werburghs

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Stinkfish.

Bringing Bogota to Bristol, this blazing wall of colour faces out from a residential street.

30. Aldi car park, Southville

© Paul Green 2015 / Via paulgreenphotography.com

Artist: Herakut. Visit their Facebook page here.

A full-scale mural on a sizeable Victorian building, full of detail and melancholy.

Big thanks to Upfest for their suggestions.

Upfest, Europe’s largest street art and graffiti festival, will be held in Bristol in July 2015. To find out more, visit upfest.co.uk.

I Didn’t Know Something So Ordinary Had So Much Potential. I Want To See This EVERYWHERE.

Street art is becoming much more of an accepted and legitimate form of art these days and it can take on many incredible forms, from simple graffiti on the side of an old brick wall in an inner city neighborhood to world famous art pieces by street artists such as Banksy. What ever the type, street art does add a lot of color and life to many cities around the world, but some places have taken it to the next step by allowing street artists to decorate steps around the city. Here are 15 beautiful examples of incredibly colorful and artistic looking city steps around the world:

1) Valparaíso, Chile.

2) Seoul, South Korea.

3) Valparaíso, Chile.

4) 16th Avenue Tiled Steps, San Francisco.

5) Angers, France.

6) Sicily, Italy.

7) Philadelphia Museum of Art.

8) Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

9) Wuppertal, Germany.

10) Beirut, Lebanon.

11) Stairs to the musical theater in Seoul, South Korea.

12) Istanbul, Turkey.

13) Stairs of Peace in Syria.

14) Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

15) Morlaix, France.

(H/T Bored Panda) Share these incredible works of street art with your friends below.

He Started Shaking Sand Onto A Table, And By The End, He’d Created Something Incredible

In Hindu culture, rangoli is an art form that’s centered around the creation of ornate designs made out of colorful sand. Created to honor deities, they are meticulous and beautiful. The most fascinating thing about them, however, is how they’re made.

Watch what happens when this artist starts shaking sand onto his work space.

Seeing creators in action is always such a humbling experience. If you want to learn more about rangoli, check out this blog!

When Vandalism Goes Very, Very RIGHT… You Get These 25 Works Of Inspiration.

Inspiration is a lot like a ride to work on a hot summer day after your car breaks down–it doesn’t matter where it comes from, just as long as it gets you to where you need to be. You’ll probably appreciate it more if it doesn’t involve speaking at length about your neighbor Doug’s recent trip to Slacks “R” Us, but beggars can’t be choosers. If encouragement comes by way of graffiti on a wall, take it! At least it looks cool (no offense, Doug). Take a look at some go-getting graffiti.

1.) We Are The Creators Of Our Own Happiness

2.) Let’s Change The World For Good

3.) In The Midst Of Winter, I Found There Was Within Me An Invincible Summer

4.) Act Like You Know

5.) Who Are You / You Are You

6.) Stop Worrying

7.) Let’s Adore And Endure Each Other

8.) Contemplate How Awesome Life Really Is

9.) If You Want To Achieve Greatness, Stop Asking For Permission

10.) It’s Time To Dance

11.) Like Takes Time

12.) Create Now

13.) You Look Nice Today

14.) I Am In The World To Change The World

15.) Lives Change Here

16.) You Already Know How

17.) Ain’t No Stopping Me

18.) You Go Girl

19.) I Was Somebody

20.) Live A Great Story

21.) It Just Blooms

22.) Know You Are Enough

23.) Everything Will Be Okay

24.) Stand Up For Something

25.) You’re Never Too Young To Dream Big

(H/T BuzzFeed) Well, I’m inspired. No, not to do graffiti, Doug. Your walls are safe, relax! Share this post using the button below.

Seeing This In The Middle Of The Street Just Made My Day. It Needs To Be EVERYWHERE.

Very few people have what it takes to be an artist professionally. There are even fewer people who are capable enough to spontaneously create art on the street or in other public venues. Oak Oak, however, is a French artist who can do just that. He takes the seemingly normal or mundane on the street and transforms it. He entertains passers by with his art, which is whimsical, silly and sometimes just a little bit strange. This is the kind of art you wouldn’t be likely to forget if you just saw it in the middle of the street.

The artist sees little people and faces everywhere.

Ouch.

Sometimes, they’re not doing so well.

He also draws inspiration from cartoons like Futurama.

Or Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

Randomly seeing this kind of stuff would make most people’s day.

Even if it’s a little weird.

Oak Oak sees whimsy in the mundane.

He also draws inspiration from The Simpsons.

His art is the best.

Source: Oak Oak His hilarious and imaginative street art makes the urban environment a better place. Who wouldn’t love seeing a little bit of silliness whilst on their commute to a 9-5 job? If you liked his art, share it. Hopefully it’ll inspire others to make the world as silly as Oak Oak sees it.

The Optical Illusion Street Art That Just Appeared In Istanbul Is Beautiful.

Spanish street artist Pejac recently visited Istanbul and, of course, left behind some new pieces in the Uskudar district on the Asian side of the city. Collectively, the three pieces are called “Lock, Poster and Shutters.”

Lock

The three new pieces were placed closely together. They are each surreal interpretations of windows. Their realistic style makes them appear, at first glance, to actually be features of the wall they’re painted on.

Pejac uses acrylic paint, pencil and sandpaper to create the designs. He uses colors similar to their surroundings for a natural, unassuming look. The illusion is all in the technique, which is known as trompe l’oeil. The term is French for “deceive the eye.”

Poster

The creation of Poster

The pieces each depict windows, or at least some version of them. Pejac explains that he chose windows as his subject to explore the concepts of the “perception and illusion of freedom.” He chose to use the trompe l’oeil technique specifically for this project. He described it as a “trap” and said, in a press release, “in the case of these three windows the trap works in both directions: from outside to inside and from inside to outside.”

Shutters

Via Colossal|Complex

Pejac has been making a name for himself in the street art world, and if you’re interested in his work, you can follow him on Instagram and Facebook.

The Very Best Art On The Berlin Wall, According To Tourists

Visitors to Berlin show us their favourite art on the capital’s fallen wall at the East Side Gallery and tell us why it’s special.

Dana Reynolds, 27, from Melbourne, Australia, and John Linari, 23, from Seattle, United States

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Click to listen to John:

“I really like this piece because in general the Berlin Wall has so much history and social attachment to all the different conflicts that have happened in Berlin and in Germany as a whole. In most places they don’t have a wall for graffiti and someone expressing themselves. I really like this one because personally there’s so much detail, it’s very abstract, but you can see what’s going on, you see the different areas, people holding prized possessions. It catches your eye, makes you want to stare at it and take it all in.” – John Linari Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Listen to Dana:

“I think I particularly like this piece because of the scale and the juxtaposition with the surroundings. It’s a really nice balance of chaos and simplicity – the colours are really enjoyable.” – Dana Reynolds Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

 

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Katie, 23, from Australia

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Katie said this was her favourite because of the “colour and symmetry”.

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Gianmarco Trapani, 23, from Italy

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Listen to Gianmarco:

“I must say that this is the first time I’ve seen this – I’ve been here three or four times in this part of Berlin, and this is the first time I recognise this painting, and I like it because of the idea that someone else is pushing your thumb up. I guess it reminds me of the Soviet Union somehow. That’s why I like it.” – Gianmarco Trapani Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Nicolò, 23, from Italy

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Listen to Nicolò:

“I like this because it looks like there is a woman trying to keep out all the armies and violence from the planet. You can see how outside this planet there is a spreading rainbow and some roots of trees, and some guys that are partying, they are happy.” – Nicolò Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Hanneleen, 16, Laila, 16, Mieke, 17, and Jondahl, 16, from the Netherlands

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Listen to Hanneleen and her friends:

“I really like this work of art by Peter Russell because the colours are very beautiful, there’s a lot to see, it’s really full, so it catches your eye. Everything on this wall has symbolism that really speaks to me, which makes it very interesting to look at and also the way it is painted is very beautiful. It’s nice that you need to have time to look at it – you have to look longer at it to understand what it means, and what the artist means with it.” – Hanneleen and friends Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Sillmann Helge, 44, from Germany

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

“Albert Einstein is a very famous person in Germany and he’s a very intelligent guy who has always impressed me.” – Sillmann Helge

Andrew Allan, 17, from Sydney, Australia

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

“This piece of art seems so incongruous with everything, because you’ve got the history of the Berlin Wall, where you’re entering either the American or Russian sector. I just love that they decide to go with the Japanese sector instead. It’s completely out of place, and for that purpose I absolutely love it. Me with my Russian hat, being in Germany, looking at the Japanese sector. I just love how it all comes together.” – Andrew Allan

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Andrew, 29, from London

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

“I think this art stands out because it’s predominantly black, which the rest of them aren’t, the rest are trying to be very colourful. It’s remarkably different. The black is fitting, as the days of the Berlin Wall depict a very depressing atmosphere etc, [and] with Tokyo and New York it shows international influences in Berlin. All that combined, along with the depiction of the Berlin TV Tower and the big rotating Mercedes symbol, brings it all together quite nicely.” – Andrew

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

 

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Johnnie, 28, from Australia, and Elize, 25, from Singapore

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Listen to Johnnie:

“I like this piece because it signifies freedom, so humans are able to overcome any type of obstacle and get to the final goal, and it’s colourful.” Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

The Fernandez family, from Madrid, Spain

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Listen to the Fernandez family:

“We like this one because it’s very colourful and it’s a gloomy day, and because it reminds us of the Spanish painter Picasso.” – the Fernandez family Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Alice, 28, and Alberto, 38, from Italy

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

“We like this because the hands appear to press the wall.” – Alice.

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Chiara, 25, and Gianluca, 26, from Italy

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

“I like this art because of the year 1989, which was an important year for German people, but also for me, as it’s the year I was born.” – Chiara

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Melissa Bowen, 22, from London

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Listen to Melissa:

“I like the dove because it’s on the Berlin Wall, which represents sort of the peace when it was brought down, and then you’ve got the chain instead of the branches [the dove] normally holds, which represents the breaking of the peace. It’s a bit more symbolic than just the branches.” – Melissa Bowen Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Tom Colwill, 21, from London

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

This piece of art was on an adjoining wall to the Berlin Wall that was adorned with equally impressive art. Tom enjoyed it with quiet appreciation.

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Laura, 25, from Colombia

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Listen to Laura (in Spanish):

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Listen to Laura’s friend translate her into English:

“She says that she likes the controversy of it because it reflects modern times, especially the shock, as the people are dressed like really important people from the parliament, government people, and that makes it even more of a shock.” – Laura’s friend Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed
























































20 Artists Who Used The World As Their Canvas. Beautiful.

City dwellers are used to tuning out the things around them: noisy buskers, people with fliers, and all the concrete blending into even more concrete. You can get from point A to B without ever lifting your head. But some artists out there are demanding the attention of even the most oblivious urbanite with their eye-catching street projects.

They use ordinary objects as their canvas, and suddenly they become extraordinary. Take a look!

1.) Little Italy, literally.

2.) Did you just walk into a cartoon?

3.) This was not the droid you were looking for.

4.) Imagine getting gas at this station.

5.) Is this a phone booth or a little piece of heaven?

6.) Classiest parking lot in the world.

7.) You never have to worry about forgetting your umbrella on this street.

8.) Art really does imitate life.

9.) Why hit the bricks when you can hit the books instead.

10.) A real fish out of water.

11.) It’s a concrete jungle out there.

12.) This guy looks like he needs a dentist.

13.) Better over your head than under your foot.

14.) This probably makes it really easy to give directions to their apartment.

15.) Follow the rainbow…

16.) Or soak the rainbow up in this hallway.

17.) Really rope things off.

18.) Seriously, that’s just impressive.

19.) Keep your trees cozy.

20.) This park will blow your mind.

(via Amazng Facts.)

I need to see all of those things! I guess I should start aimlessly wandering around the world’s biggest and best cities. I can’t imagine what it would feel like walking down the street just to see something so awesome. Click below to share these amazing pieces of street art with others!