Tag Archives: animals

18 Animals With Ridiculously Misleading Names. Where Did They Come Up With These?

It often feels like everyone in the world is out to trick you. If you think you’re getting a good deal on something, chances are you getting swindled in another way. Of course, we like to use that to our advantage when, say, we turn 29 for the third time.

As it turns out, you can’t even trust animals to tell you the truth anymore. Especially these critters who are all lying to us with their misleading names. Take a look.

1.) Flying Lemurs

They are neither lemurs nor can they fly. Also known as colugos, they were named for their similar features and nocturnal habits, but are closer in relation to primates.

2.) Australian Shepherd

These blue eyed beauties are bred in Europe. Their close relationship to the Australian Basque shepherds gave them their antipodean moniker.

3.) Hedgehog

They have zero relation to pigs or hogs. Their name comes from the discovery that the spiky foragers grunt similarly while hunting.

4.) Red Panda

These adorable animals should have received the name “red raccoons.” They share an equal relation to both raccoons and pandas, but not quite one or the other.

5.) Polecat

These adorable fuzzy faces aren’t related to felines at all. They’re part of the weasel family and were likely named after the French words “poule” and “chat” for their love of poultry.

6.) Koala Bears

Though they look like cuddly teddy bears, koalas are marsupials and more related to kangaroos. But you can’t blame people for wanting to give them a cuddly name.

7.) Sea Lion

Obviously they aren’t lions of the sea, but something called pinnipeds. That means they’re mammals who walk around on their flippers when on land. Their name comes from the thick mane that is often found on their necks, like lions.

8.) Ladybug

These insects aren’t all ladies, and are actually a type of beetle. Their name comes from the Middle Ages when farmers prayed for relief from more nefarious insects eating their crops. When these speckled little bugs came around to eat those jerks, they were given the name “Bug of Our Lady,” referencing the Virgin Mary.

9.) Mountain Goat

Even though they look and sound just like their namesake, these animals are more closely related to antelopes.

10.) Cuttlefish

Nope, it’s not a fish. They’re cephalopods, a species existing for 500 million years. Their internal structure is known as a “cuttlebone,” providing them with their buoyancy and name.

11.) White Rhinos

Their color doesn’t reflect the name, but what makes them unique from other rhinos is the square shape of their mouth.

12.) Fireflies

Named for the “fire” light they emit at night, they are not actually flies. They’re beetles.

13.) Aardwolf

It sounds like the result of an aardvark falling in love with a wolf, but it isn’t related to either of those animals. This is a type of hyena named from the Afrikaans word meaning “earth-wolf.”

14.) Killer Whale

The killer aspect is definitely not a misnomer. As one the largest predators in the ocean, they hunt prey in packs of up to 40. But they’re not whales at all. They’re dolphins.

15.) Geoduck

Pronounced “goo-ee-duc,” these are not actual ducks. Instead, they are a type of clam found in the Pacific Northwest. The misleading name comes from the Nisqually Indian word “qweduc,” which translates to “dig deep.”

16.) Mountain Chicken

This obviously isn’t a chicken. These frogs are one of the world’s most threatened of their species, likely due to their tasty, apparently chicken-flavored meat.

17.) Sea Cucumbers

This cucumber wouldn’t go well in your next salad. The echinoderms come in several shapes and sizes and are closely related to starfish and sea urchins.

18.) Komodo Dragon

Since dragons (sadly) aren’t real, this is nothing more than a large lizard. Its forked tongue inspired the mythical moniker.

(via The Dodo.)

This makes you wonder who we CAN trust in this crazy, mixed up world. Okay, so it might not be that big a deal, but it does make you think about how often we take things like names at face value. Now I want to go back and rename these guys. 

A Man Going For A Jog Found This Baby Bird. You Have To See Next 36 Days… AMAZING.

Veterinarian ‘DachsUndDachshund‘ recently posted this amazing story to imgur about how out jogging one day he stumbled upon this tiny freshly hatched songbird that had fallen out of its nest. Unable to locate the nest so he could return the baby bird to it, he decided to take it home and hand raise it himself until it was big and health enough to be released into the world to sing its songs. Here is the amazingly beautiful story that is sure to put a smile on your face:

Day 1 – Here is the little chick on the first day. My brother had been out jogging, and found it on the sidewalk. It was actually still attached to part of its shell and some dried membranes. Clearly freshly hatched, we were unable to locate the nest in the group of trees above us. **NOTE** if you find a bird this young, it is best to try to locate the nest and put it back in. There is a myth that you can’t touch a baby bird, because the parents will reject it due to the smell of humans. PLEASE don’t try this at home! This is not meant as a guide, but more to show you the amazing development and growth of songbirds. Wildlife rehabilitation should only be carried out by those licensed to do so!

“” Day 1 – Here is the little chick on the first day. My brother had been out jogging, and found it on the sidewalk. It was actually still attached to part of its shell and some dried membranes. Clearly freshly hatched, we were unable to locate the nest in the group of trees above us. **NOTE** if you find a bird this young, it is best to try to locate the nest and put it back in. There is a myth that you can”

Day 2 – Aren’t baby birds cute in an ugly kind of way? We kept the chick in an incubator, carefully controlling the humidity and temperature. We decided she was a she (though we were never able to find out if it was male or female), and called her “Dumpling.” All baby birds look very similar, so we had no way to really know what kind of bird this was. We’d have to wait and see how she grew, and what her feathers looked like.

Day 3 – Baby birds eat a lot! We fed this chick primarily with crickets, mealworms, waxworms, caught insects, and a commercially available liquid formula for chicks. We fed the chick every 30 minutes for 14 hours/day, simulating what she would get in the wild. Just imagine what that means! This was just one chick, and most songbird broods will have anywhere from 2 – 5 chicks. The amount of insects songbird parents need to catch to feed their chicks (and themselves) is a bit staggering when you think about it. Since the parents don’t feed their chicks overnight, we didn’t either. This is opposed to many mammalian babies that need to be fed regularly around the clock.

“” Day 3 – Baby birds eat a lot! We fed this chick primarily with crickets, mealworms, waxworms, caught insects, and a commercially available liquid formula for chicks. We fed the chick every 30 minutes for 14 hours\/day, simulating what she would get in the wild. Just imagine what that means! This was just one chick, and most songbird broods will have anywhere from 2 – 5 chicks. The amount of insects songbird parents need to catch to feed their chicks (and themselves) is a bit staggering when you think about it. Since the parents don”

Day 4 – You can see here the amazing development of the wing feathers in just a few days’ time. Also, she had a hilarious wispy mohawk of down feathers that got even more ridiculous when she got a little older. She would start squawking to be fed every 30-45 minutes. An interesting note: instincts are fascinating with these animals. Even with the poor coordination and closed eyes, this chick knew enough to back up to the edge of the nest we made for her and poop over the side, so as to not dirty the nest.

Day 5 – By day 5, Dumpling was able to sit more “sternal” (on her chest with the legs tucked under her body) with more stability. Look at the changes in the feathers in just another 24 hours! She is actually starting to look like a bird! Her eyes were starting to open just a little bit by this time, as well.

“” Day 5 – By day 5, Dumpling was able to sit more \”sternal\” (on her chest with the legs tucked under her body) with more stability. Look at the changes in the feathers in just another 24 hours! She is actually starting to look like a bird! Her eyes were starting to open just a little bit by this time, as well.””

Day 6 – Here is a nice shot of the amazing continued development of her wing feathers. You can see them encased in a cornified sheath. Once the feather gets to its final size, this sheath disintegrates and the feather is allowed to spread open.

Day 7 – Overnight, all of the feather sheaths fell away and -tada!- we have a bird! You can see here as well that she has a bent lateral toe on her left leg. Not much to be done about that in a bird this small, and it really didn’t slow her down at all.

“” Day 7 – Overnight, all of the feather sheaths fell away and -tada!- we have a bird! You can see here as well that she has a bent lateral toe on her left leg. Not much to be done about that in a bird this small, and it really didn”

Day 8 – “FEED ME!!” At this point, she was eating 3 large crickets +/- waxworms at every feeding.

Day 9 – By this time, we were able to stop using the incubator. Since her body was covered in feathers, she was able to regulate her body heat on her own. The tufts of chick fluff and the eternally grumpy expression that baby birds have was hilarious.

“” Day 9 – By this time, we were able to stop using the incubator. Since her body was covered in feathers, she was able to regulate her body heat on her own. The tufts of chick fluff and the eternally grumpy expression that baby birds have was hilarious.””

Day 10 – We moved her into more of a conventional cage, and gave her more materials to explore. She was really happy, despite her expression.

Day 11 – She was able to officially perch for the first time! Definitely a big step in the right direction. She doesn’t have much of a tail yet, so her balance isn’t great, but she had a really strong grip and could hold herself up there very well, bad toe and all.

“” Day 11 – She was able to officially perch for the first time! Definitely a big step in the right direction. She doesn”

Day 12 – She was a very sweet little bird, and enjoyed perching on our hands, early on. You can see some sprouting millet seeds in the background, which we added to her diet to continue to increase the variety of food she was exposed to. By this point, we actually didn’t have to feed her as often. We would hand feed her every 1-2 hours, and place worms in the cage for her to forage for in between times.

Day 13 – Almost 2 weeks from hatching, and she is now perching very well! You can see that her strength and balance has improved even compared to Day 11. Her legs are more upright, showing a better perching posture. This “hocks up” posture is very characteristic of 14-day old songbird chicks, so she is right on schedule.

“” Day 13 – Almost 2 weeks from hatching, and she is now perching very well! You can see that her strength and balance has improved even compared to Day 11. Her legs are more upright, showing a better perching posture. This \”hocks up\” posture is very characteristic of 14-day old songbird chicks, so she is right on schedule.””

Day 14 – She is starting to look more mature. That hilarious baby down is disappearing. Now that she is over 2 weeks old, I’ll start skipping days.

Day 17 – Here she is in a larger cage that she graduated to. We put in freshly cut branches so she can have a variety of perching options, and can explore the leaves and twigs like she would in the wild. By this point, she is hopping and flying around the cage like a professional. **NOTE** Any of you with pet birds, it is very important to have a variety of perches. The best ones are branches you cut yourself from non-toxic trees. It’s great, healthy enrichment for your pets!

“” Day 17 – Here she is in a larger cage that she graduated to. We put in freshly cut branches so she can have a variety of perching options, and can explore the leaves and twigs like she would in the wild. By this point, she is hopping and flying around the cage like a professional. **NOTE** Any of you with pet birds, it is very important to have a variety of perches. The best ones are branches you cut yourself from non-toxic trees. It”

Day 22 – We started placing her cage out on the deck to get her exposed to the wind, the sun and other birds. This is important for socialization and training. Other birds would come to the feeders and interact with her, and she could watch them and learn their songs.

Day 23 – This is one of my favorite pictures of her, showing her wonderfully patterned feathers. By this point, we decided she was likely a White Crowned Sparrow or Chipping Sparrow. WCS is a species of bird that is common around here, but you don’t see them often because they don’t come to bird feeders regularly. Chipping Sparrows are very common, but there were a few pictures of juveniles that didn’t match well with her. Both are a migratory species, traveling south for the winter. We were hoping to get her fit for release in plenty of time to make that trip.

“” Day 23 – This is one of my favorite pictures of her, showing her wonderfully patterned feathers. By this point, we decided she was likely a White Crowned Sparrow or Chipping Sparrow. WCS is a species of bird that is common around here, but you don”

Day 25 – Another lovely side view of her, showing her feather patterning. It provides for great camouflage as they flit among the trees.

Day 27 – By this time, she was completely off of eating crickets (showed absolutely no interest in them), and her diet was more seed and worm-based. She was also eating on her own, completely. She actually didn’t let us feed her anymore, which was a good sign.

“” Day 27 – By this time, she was completely off of eating crickets (showed absolutely no interest in them), and her diet was more seed and worm-based. She was also eating on her own, completely. She actually didn”

Day 29 – She loved all of the new leafy branches we’d put in for her. A large part of their diet in the wild is tree buds, and she’d go after those immediately whenever we put fresh branches in for her.

Day 33 – At this point, she was essentially releasable. However, there were some expected storms rolling in over the next few days, so we decided to keep her for a few days longer to give her the best chance.

“” Day 33 – At this point, she was essentially releasable. However, there were some expected storms rolling in over the next few days, so we decided to keep her for a few days longer to give her the best chance.””

Day 36, Release Day – After storms the night before, Day 36 dawned beautifully. Confident that the weather was going to be nice for several days, and that the recent rainfall would give her plenty of drinking and feeding opportunities, we decided this would be the perfect day to send her on her way! We drove to a nearby nature preserve about a mile from where she was initially found and where we knew there to be others of her kind.

Bye Bye, Dumpling! – We opened the cage door and stepped back. After a few minutes, she hopped out and flitted immediately up into a tree. She didn’t hesitate at all. She immediately started exploring the branches, biting at tree buds and hopping from branch-to-branch like a wild bird. Pretty soon, we lost sight of her.

“” Bye Bye, Dumpling! – We opened the cage door and stepped back. After a few minutes, she hopped out and flitted immediately up into a tree. She didn”

What an absolutely amazing story. The fact he raised a tiny pink, helpless, fetus-looking thing into a release-ready bird is a testament to his skill as a veterinarian. It should be noted that the rearing of any wildlife can be difficult, and should only be undertaken by those trained (and licensed, in many cases) to do so. Many animals, especially migratory birds, are protected under federal law, and it is illegal to have them in your care without the proper permits. If you find any injured or sick wildlife, your best bet is to look for a local wildlife rehabilitation organization. Source: imgur Share this heart-warming animal rescue story with your friends below.

This Guy Rescued 12 Ducklings From A Manhole And Still Had Enough Time To Melt My Heart.

When this mother duck was out for a walk during a nice and warm summer day with her 12 little ones, she crossed a manhole grate and sadly all her duckling got stuck down in a drain. Luckily for mama duck, some nearby office workers heard her cries of distress and hatched a daring rescue plan.

If I would’ve been that mama duck I would’ve been freaking out, biting everybody, screaming for my babies, totally making the situation worse. Props to mama duck’s composure, way to keep it together girl. (Source: Tommy Allen) Share this ducktastic rescue video with your friends and family below.

Deer Rule This Japanese Town And It’s Pretty Much The Greatest Thing Ever

Every city and town around the world has that one thing that makes it unique.

Most towns may be known for their architecture, famous former residents, or even a festival or major event that draws large crowds. While these claims to fame are enough on their own, nothing quite compares to the woodland creatures taking over one Japanese city. If “Bambi” was your favorite Disney movie growing up, then the city of Nara is the one for you.

It might surprise you to learn that Nara, Japan, isn’t known for its breathtaking architecture.

Read More: This Is The Heartbreaking Moment One Dog Had To Say Goodbye To Her Best Friend

Instead the city’s claim to fame is the fact that these cuties basically run the place.

Getty Images

When A Yellow Lab Found A Baby Bunny In Her Yard, She Had The Best Reaction

Meg is your average, adorable yellow labrador retriever. She goes about her days playing in the yard, but on one special afternoon, she came across a tiny new playmate. Thankfully, Meg’s dad, David Jackson, was nearby and filmed the incredible meeting.

Be prepared to die from cuteness overload.

Little John Stamos (aka the bunny) just stole my heart.

I think we could all benefit from bookmarking this video and coming back to it later when we need a pick-me-up.

She Was Just Out In Her Garage When She Came Face To Face With A Huge Bear

A Florida woman recently filmed her close encounter with a black bear, and even though these creatures are usually pretty docile, the footage is still harrowing.

Teliece Sander of Seminole County, Florida, was sitting in her driveway and playing games on her phone when she looked up and realized that a massive bear was approaching. Having heard that you should keep calm at all costs in these situations, she didn’t panic and sat there quietly, taking a picture of the large beast, which she then sent to her son. To the attachment, she added the words “help me.”

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As the bear got closer, she realized that it seemed quite tame, so she did something that few people would ever have the courage to do. She caught the entire encounter on film.

Luckily for Teliece, this potentially deadly situation ended when her son, who is extremely tall and weighs 325 pounds, walked out of the house and scared the bear away with his presence.

15 Animals That Don’t Give A Damn About Our Stupid Human Laws

Humans have made up a lot of rules to keep order, but in the animal kingdom? Things are still a bit more wild!

The 15 animals on this list don’t give a damn about stupid human rules. Do we seriously expect a sign to keep dogs out of a park? Or a front door to keep kangaroos from breaking in and eating all of our toilet paper? From the looks of things, some of these animals are completely aware that they’re breaking the law, but they couldn’t care less.

1. “A sign won’t stop me! My kind has been climbing these rocks for centuries.”

2. Bold move, bird. You are a true rebel.

3. This mama cat is already teaching her baby how to break the rules.

Mama cat teaches her kitten how to break the rules.

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These Honest Dog Shaming Photos Put Dog Shaming Photos To Shame

Dog shaming is a popular meme on the internet lately. The basic concept is that a dog shamer’s dog misbehaves, he/she adorns a sign on their beloved friend stating what the dog did, snaps a picture, and presumably Rover’s dog friends will see it and mock him at all the popular dog barbecues. Does it really work though? These honest dog shaming photos may have the answer.

Somehow I don’t think this weird form of medieval torture is getting through to our canine friends. If you love the pooches and are mystified that people actually do this, give this a share on Facebook!

Baby Swan Stuck In A Fence Gets Rescued, But Not Before Daddy Causes A Scene.

Simon from the Wildlife Aid Foundation received a call about a cygnet (young swan) that found itself in a terrible predicament by getting stuck in a fence. Once near the stuck little swan, Simon had to face an angry cob (male swan) that wouldn’t let anybody near his poor baby.

As he attempted to get the baby swan free, the cob kept on swiping at him with its powerful wings. Simon wouldn’t let it faze him and kindly told the angry male swan “don’t be silly” and to “stop it”. Which is just the most adorably English thing I’ve ever heard. I was half expecting him to offer the swan a cup of tea, too.

(Source: Wildlife Aid)

Seeing that beautiful family swim off at the end was totally worth the few bruises Simon may have received from that cob.

This Massive Shark Is Older Than America And She’s Still Alive And Kicking

Shark Week 2016 has come and gone, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t still plenty of ocean predators out there prowling the water for their next meal.

When we compare ourselves to sharks, sure they outmatch us in the physical strength and ferocity departments, but there’s no way they beat us in the age department, right? We humans live longer, more fruitful lives than sharks. Well, not if we’re talking about Greenland sharks.

The Greenland shark, also known as the gray shark, has some amazing genetics. A study of several deceased female Greenland sharks found that the largest one had lived for about 400 years and only died quite recently.

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The study looked at the bodies of 28 Greenland sharks in total. Of those 28, eight were at least 200 years old when they died.

iStock

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The biggest shark researchers looked at was probably born around 1620. That would make her older than the United States!

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When Greenland sharks are born, they grow at the maddeningly slow pace of about one centimeter per year. Most only reach sexual maturity around the age of 150.

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Who knows what keys to aging further study of these Greenland sharks might uncover…

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(via Mysterious Universe)

Now that is amazing. I would love to see a whole special on the Greenland shark. I wonder how they would stack up against the more ferocious predators in the ocean…